4 Most Violated Comma Rules in Legal Documents + Quiz - Internet Scoping School

4 Most Violated Comma Rules in Legal Documents + Quiz

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  • bambakidis says:

    I am having trouble understanding the lack of comma in:

    ” I have no intentions of apologizing so don’t ask me to.” (I feel like rule 2 should apply with a comma.) Should I brush up on types of clauses or how do I get a grasp of this? thanks!

    • Linda Evenson says:

      Sent you an email. According to Morson’s, each independent clause needs to have five words or more to require a comma. This will be covered in Fundamental Punctuation and Word Use, Module 2 of the Scoping Fundamentals section.

  • bambakidis says:

    In the bonus section:

    “Use a comma before a noun of direct address at the beginning or ending of a sentence:
    Mr. Jeffers, would you please state your name for the record?”

    Is it me or does the example sentence not relate to the rule?

  • bambakidis says:

    “Rule 2: Use a comma before the conjunctions and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so when they separate two independent clauses of five words of more each”

    I spot a typo– “…clauses of five words of more”

  • bambakidis says:

    Question #7: Choose the sentence with proper comma placement.
    Correct
    Your Answer:

    You didn’t know which doctor to go, or else you would have gone, right?
    {{shouldn’t there be a “to” after the “go”?}}
    Correct Answer:

    You didn’t know which doctor to go, or else you would have gone, right?

    Other Possible Answers:

    You didn’t know which doctor to go to or else you would have gone, right?

    • Linda Evenson says:

      “…to go to” is correct. Morson’s also says each independent clause should be five words or more in order to require a comma, so I have change this answer to no comma. Great job!

  • susanh_5@yahoo.com says:

    Commas have always been tricky, and while I hope that I have a pretty good feel for them, it’s apparent that I don’t know many of the official rules. I did, however, have a question about:

    “I went there, I spoke to him, and then I left.”

    Why is it not more correct to use a semi-colon after the first clause in order to avoid a comma splice? Does it have something to do with the list nature of the sentence?

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